FAQs

Dwighty, how does the charity part of the business work?

All of the profits (money the shop makes after I restock and pay the bills) goes to getting underserved local kids guitars and/or amps or whatever they need to rock and roll. I do not collect a salary.

Any instrument or equipment that is donated to Orphan Guitars will either be given to a kid (usually starter instruments or pretty messed up ones) or sold (more valuable stuff). When it is sold, the entire amount (minus whatever it took to get it in sellable shape) will go to getting stuff for kids to rock with or to the CHiPS food kitchen and shelter in Park Slope, Brooklyn. Which of these it is depends on Covid and demand from kids and teachers, etc.

I am not an official not-for-profit! You cannot deduct donations from your taxes. It's too expensive right now to become one. If you're a lawyer and want to help Orphan become one pro bono, well, heck, gimme a call.

Dwighty, what are your return policies?

All used guitars and amps are sold "as is".

Used guitars and amps may be returned for store credit only within 30 days of purchase. They must be in the same condition as when you bought them.

BE ADVISED! Amps will be in working order when you leave with them. After that you are subject to the terrifying will and whims of the Amp Gods, and they are notorious pricks.

Any new guitars, effects or accessories (cables, unused strings, capos, etc.) can be returned for refund or exchanged within 14 days of purchase date.

Dwighty, what is a "lawsuit" guitar?

Let me tell you! Because for a couple decades in the '70s and '80s, Some Japanese companies were copying American guitars and making them as good or better and way cheaper than the USA. Gibson and Fender got super pissed and eventually sued the crap out of the Japanese until the Japanese just changed the shape of the headstocks a little and kept on making awesome cheaper guitars. So the pre-lawsuit guitars that are exact copies are often referred to as "lawsuit" guitars. They are the best thing in the world. An amazing guitar for half the price.

Dwighty, does Orphan Guitars do consignment?

Nope. But we do buy guitars and do trades on guitars, amps or effects pedals.

Dwighty, does Orphan Guitars buy and/or trade guitars, amps, or effects pedals?

Yup. It's not guaranteed your stuff will be what we need right at the moment, but it works out quite often.

Dwighty, do you change strings?

Yup. $20. Or I'll teach you how to do it for $20. Teach a man to fish and all that.

Dwighty, how long do guitar repairs normally take?

A basic set-up is normally 7-10 business days. Other more complicated repairs vary. If parts need to be ordered, then it's determined by when we get said parts. In Covid times, allowances must be made for slower delivery of parts and the occasional Covid scare among the guitar techs that may delay things. Any time frame quoted to you by Orphan Guitars is not a guarantee.

 

Dwighty, is there a guarantee on repairs?

If work done on a guitar, amp or electronics fails within 90 days of repair being picked up by owner, we will fix it again at no charge, UNLESS a part or electronic component purchased from a third party fails. We'll have to charge you to fix that. Occasionally, you may be informed that a repair being made is a bit of a band-aid and can not be guaranteed. Such repairs will only be done after client approval. In these cases, we will not repair them again for free if they fail within 30 days.

We're real cool about this stuff, but used and vintage guitars are fickle creatures, so you be cool, too. Then everything will be cool. 

Dwighty, do I need an appointment to bring in repairs or donations?

Nope.

Dwighty, what kind of donations do you accept?

We will gratefully accept almost any guitar, banjo, ukelele, or mandolin. If an instrument is too costly or complicated to repair, we will just strip it for parts. We'll tell you what we're going to do with it, so it'll be up to you whether to leave it or not. We also happily accept guitar parts, hardware and electronics.

Same goes for amps. Effects pedals, however, we may not know they're too far gone till after you've donated. So, sorry if they end up in the scrap heap. You're still a rad citizen.